Last tickets

This is a not for profit initiative with the net proceeds of the evening being distributed to Plastics Charities.

The statistics are devastating. Plastic has increased twenty-fold over the past 50 years, and will double again in the next 20 years. Already present in the stomachs of nearly all the world’s marine birds, by 2050 plastics in the ocean will outweigh fish, covering large swaths of the Pacific in floating garbage slicks.

We can change this. Plastic pollution is not nature’s choice but ours.

On 3rd May, at the Royal Institution, the How to: Academy and The New York Times will host a landmark evening conference on saving the planet from plastic.

With a keynote address by Michael Gove, Secretary of State for the Environment, followed by 16 inspirational speakers in the forefront of the fight, covering initiatives by consumers and brands, business and government; proposing changes to the plastic footprint of supermarkets and travel; exploring the outlook for recycling and the development of natural bio-plastics; urgently pooling their expertise on the alternatives in view.

Join us and turn the tide.


Read related articles from The New York Times

Trillions of Plastic Bits, Swept Up by Current, Are Littering Arctic Waters – by Tatiana Schlossberg

The Immense, Eternal Footprint Humanity Leaves on Earth: Plastics – by Tatiana Schlossberg


Sign up here to get Climate Fwd:, a weekly email from The New York Times with latest stories and insights about climate change.


As part of our collaboration with The New York Times, take advantage of a special digital subscription offer saving 60% off for one year. With investigative reporting and analysis from experts in the field, The Times uncovers the stories that impact the world.

 

Speakers

Keynote Speech

Rt Hon Michael Gove

Keynote Speech

Secretary of State: Department for Environment Food & Rural Affairs

The Rt Hon Michael Gove MP was appointed Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on 11 June 2017. He was elected Conservative MP for Surrey Heath in 2005.

The Rt Hon Michael Gove MP was appointed Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on 11 June 2017. He was elected Conservative MP for Surrey Heath in 2005.

What’s the problem?

Emily Penn

What’s the problem?

Ocean Advocate

Emily Penn is an ocean advocate, skipper and international public speaker and advisor on issues relating to our ocean, shifting mindsets and future society. Emily’s career as an architect took a change of course when she rounded the globe on the record-breaking bio-fuelled boat, Earthrace. What she encountered on this trip changed everything. Emily has since been driving change, organising the world record community-led waste clean-up scheme in the South Pacific, and trawling for microplastics through the Arctic Northwest Passage.

Emily Penn is an ocean advocate, skipper and international public speaker and advisor on issues relating to our ocean, shifting mindsets and future society. Emily’s career as an architect took a change of course when she rounded the globe on the record-breaking bio-fuelled boat, Earthrace. What she encountered on this trip changed everything.  Emily has since been driving change, organising the world record community-led waste clean-up scheme in the South Pacific, and trawling for microplastics through the Arctic Northwest Passage.
What can individuals do?

Alice Thomson

What can individuals do?

Columnist for The Times

Alice Thomson is an associate editor, columnist and interviewer for The Times. She has worked for The Times and The Daily Telegraph for 25 years, also as a leader writer, foreign correspondent, features writer and restaurant reviewer. Alice has written for other publications including Vogue, The Spectator and the Financial Times, and has appeared regularly on television and radio, The Today Programme, Newsnight, Question Time and Any Questions. She has been on the policy board of the CPRE and trustee of the Policy Exchange think tank. She lives in London and in Devon, where she helps look after the UK's national collection of oak trees.

Alice Thomson is an associate editor, columnist and interviewer for The Times. She has worked for The Times and The Daily Telegraph for 25 years, also as a leader writer, foreign correspondent, features writer and restaurant reviewer. Alice has written for other publications including Vogue, The Spectator and the Financial Times, and has appeared regularly on television and radio, The Today Programme, Newsnight, Question Time and Any Questions. She has been on the policy board of the CPRE and trustee of the Policy Exchange think tank. She lives in London and in Devon, where she helps look after the UK’s national collection of oak trees.

What can Business do?

Alannah Weston

What can Business do?

Deputy Chairman Selfridges Group

In May 2004, Alannah was appointed Creative Director of Selfridges. In addition to defining the creative vision for the brand, Weston led the company’s corporate social responsibility initiatives and spearheaded Project Ocean, which raised awareness of the issue of overfishing.

In January 2014, Alannah was appointed Deputy Chairman of Selfridges Group, a position she currently holds.

Alannah is a Director of George Weston Limited and is Chair of the Selfridges Group Foundation. She is also on the boards of the Reta Lila Weston Trust for Medical Research and The Garfield Weston Foundation in Canada.

Based in London, Alannah is married to the architect Alex Cochrane and they have two children.
Alannah Weston was born in Ireland and grew up in Toronto. She went on to read English at Merton College Oxford, graduating with a MA Hons in 1994.

In May 2004, Alannah was appointed Creative Director of Selfridges. In addition to defining the creative vision for the brand, Weston led the company’s corporate social responsibility initiatives and spearheaded Project Ocean, which raised awareness of the issue of overfishing.

 

In January 2014, Alannah was appointed Deputy Chairman of Selfridges Group, a position she currently holds.

 

Alannah is a Director of George Weston Limited and is Chair of the Selfridges Group Foundation. She is also on the boards of the Reta Lila Weston Trust for Medical Research and The Garfield Weston Foundation in Canada.

 

Based in London, Alannah is married to the architect Alex Cochrane and they have two children. Alannah Weston was born in Ireland and grew up in Toronto. She went on to read English at Merton College Oxford, graduating with a MA Hons in 1994.

On the Circular Economy

Clare Brass

On the Circular Economy

Director Department 22

Clare Brass is a designer and researcher. She is director of Department 22, exploring better solutions for a better 22nd century with young creative talent and businesses, transforming environmental issues into entrepreneurial solutions. She was head of sustainability at the Design Council before setting up SEED Foundation, working on user-centred environmental challenges such as food, water and waste. She set up SustainRCA at the Royal College of Art leading on a number of commercial and academic research projects focused on the role of design in addressing sustainability and circular economy challenges. She is a mentor for the Ellen MacArthur Foundation.

Clare Brass is a designer and researcher. She is director of Department 22, exploring better solutions for a better 22nd century with young creative talent and businesses, transforming environmental issues into entrepreneurial solutions.  She was head of sustainability at the Design Council before setting up SEED Foundation, working on user-centred environmental challenges such as food, water and waste. She set up SustainRCA at the Royal College of Art leading on a number of commercial and academic research projects focused on the role of design in addressing sustainability and circular economy challenges. She is a mentor for the Ellen MacArthur Foundation.

What are brands doing?

Katrina Dodd

What are brands doing?

Senior Consultant Contagious

Katrina Dodd is a senior strategist at the London office of Contagious, a consultancy dedicated to helping brands and advertising agencies around the world understand and adapt to shifts in marketing, consumer culture and technology. Their quarterly magazine has become a global benchmark for creative excellence, with a longstanding reputation for separating the signal from the noise in a marketing landscape that gets louder and more cluttered every year. A founding member of the Contagious Insider consultancy team, she works with brands including LVMH, BBC Worldwide, Sony Music, and Nike. Katrina has a long a history of writing about what happens when creativity and commerce collide, a house full of Vogue magazines, and a lingering fascination for music videos.

Katrina Dodd is a senior strategist at the London office of Contagious, a consultancy dedicated to helping brands and advertising agencies around the world understand and adapt to shifts in marketing, consumer culture and technology. Their quarterly magazine has become a global benchmark for creative excellence, with a longstanding reputation for separating the signal from the noise in a marketing landscape that gets louder and more cluttered every year. A founding member of the Contagious Insider consultancy team, she works with brands including LVMH, BBC Worldwide, Sony Music, and Nike. Katrina has a long a history of writing about what happens when creativity and commerce collide, a house full of Vogue magazines, and a lingering fascination for music videos.

On Education & Community Action

Hugo Tagholm

On Education & Community Action

Surfers Against Sewage

Hugo Tagholm has led Surfers Against Sewage since 2008, overseeing a sustained period of development and impact, which has galvanised SAS's position as one of the UK’s most effective marine conservation and campaigning charities. Surfers Against Sewage's priority issue is marine plastic pollution and it has been at the forefront of calls for a deposit return system to stop plastic bottle pollution in our oceans. Surfers Against Sewage founded the Plastic Free Coastlines & Plastic Free Communities campaigns to spearhead community action to reduce use of throwaway plastics. The charity today represents the over 350,000 supporters nationwide and mobilises over 35,000 volunteers annually to take direct action on plastic pollution.

www.sas.org.uk

Hugo Tagholm has led Surfers Against Sewage since 2008, overseeing a sustained period of development and impact, which has galvanised SAS’s position as one of the UK’s most effective marine conservation and campaigning charities. Surfers Against Sewage’s priority issue is marine plastic pollution and it has been at the forefront of calls for a deposit return system to stop plastic bottle pollution in our oceans. Surfers Against Sewage founded the Plastic Free Coastlines & Plastic Free Communities campaigns to spearhead community action to reduce use of throwaway plastics. The charity today represents the over 350,000 supporters nationwide and mobilises over 35,000 volunteers annually to take direct action on plastic pollution. www.sas.org.uk

Creating a wave of change in travel

Justin Wateridge

Creating a wave of change in travel

Managing Director Steppes Travel

Justin has been in travel for over 25 years. Brought up in Zambia, educated at Oxford and having survived London, his travels have taken him to over ninety countries in the world. From a guide to pioneering expedition leader, and now in his current role as MD for Steppes as well as just for personal pleasure.

His travel highlights have been many but from a wildlife perspective would include spotting a snow leopard in Ladakh, tracking gorillas with the Ba’aka pygmies in Central Africa and seeing a Sei whale in the Galapagos. In terms of landscape it would be the tepuis of Venezuela, the remote island of Socotra off Yemen and the pristine beauty of the North-West Frontier Province in Pakistan. In terms of cities, Cartagena, Kashgar and Beirut. In terms of experiences, spending time with the nomadic Wodaabe in the Sahara and cycling up the Mekong River. He has recently led recce trips to Saudi Arabia, highlighted the safari potential of Chad, and been an advocate for the travel potential of Papua New Guinea.

Justin firmly believes that travel breaks down barriers and prejudice. “Travel gives us so much – experience, empathy, perspective, understanding and such vivid memories. Our world is wonderfully diverse and we should not shrink from it but experience it, relish it and use those experiences to redefine our own lives.”

He has been spearheading the Steppes Travel – Beyond Festival in London for two years, bringing together a roster of some of the most intrepid, adventurous and inspiring personalities of our time. They have been amongst the best-attended events to ever take place at the Royal Geographical Society. The last festival was specifically to fight back against plastic pollution working with the likes of charities like Plastic Ocean and speakers such as Steve Backshall, Sir Ranulph Fiennes and Simon Reeve.

Justin has been in travel for over 25 years. Brought up in Zambia, educated at Oxford and having survived London, his travels have taken him to over ninety countries in the world. From a guide to pioneering expedition leader, and now in his current role as MD for Steppes as well as just for personal pleasure.

 

His travel highlights have been many but from a wildlife perspective would include spotting a snow leopard in Ladakh, tracking gorillas with the Ba’aka pygmies in Central Africa and seeing a Sei whale in the Galapagos. In terms of landscape it would be the tepuis of Venezuela, the remote island of Socotra off Yemen and the pristine beauty of the North-West Frontier Province in Pakistan. In terms of cities, Cartagena, Kashgar and Beirut. In terms of experiences, spending time with the nomadic Wodaabe in the Sahara and cycling up the Mekong River. He has recently led recce trips to Saudi Arabia, highlighted the safari potential of Chad, and been an advocate for the travel potential of Papua New Guinea.

 

Justin firmly believes that travel breaks down barriers and prejudice. “Travel gives us so much – experience, empathy, perspective, understanding and such vivid memories. Our world is wonderfully diverse and we should not shrink from it but experience it, relish it and use those experiences to redefine our own lives.”

 

He has been spearheading the Steppes Travel – Beyond Festival in London for two years, bringing together a roster of some of the most intrepid, adventurous and inspiring personalities of our time. They have been amongst the best-attended events to ever take place at the Royal Geographical Society. The last festival was specifically to fight back against plastic pollution working with the likes of charities like Plastic Ocean and speakers such as Steve Backshall, Sir Ranulph Fiennes and Simon Reeve.

Making supermarkets plastics free

Richard Walker

Making supermarkets plastics free

Group Director Sustainability: Iceland Supermarkets

Richard Walker was born in Chester in 1980. After graduating from Durham University in 2001, with a degree in geography, he travelled extensively across Russia, China, India, South East Asia and South America before qualifying as chartered surveyor with Jones Lang LaSalle. He developed his own property business in Poland before establishing Bywater Properties, a London-based company focused on cross-sector UK property investment and development. It now has projects valued at more than £200m under development, and Richard remains its Chairman.
In 2012 Richard joined Iceland Foods, the company established by his father Malcolm in 1970. He worked full-time as a shelf-stacker and cashier in London for a year, before becoming a store manager in Swiss Cottage and moving to Iceland head office at Deeside, Flintshire, in 2013.
After various head office roles, including a spell running Iceland’s International division, Richard became Managing Director of The Food Warehouse, Iceland’s chain of 55 larger format stores, in 2015. He was also appointed Group Director for Sustainability in 2017.
Richard is married to Rebecca and they have two daughters and live in Cheshire. Outside family and business, Richard’s greatest passions are trail running, skiing, surfing and climbing all over the world. His notable climbing achievements include a 2011 expedition to climb the north side of Everest, and a 2017 trip to Kyrgyzstan where he notched up several first ascents of previously unclimbed mountains.

Richard Walker was born in Chester in 1980. After graduating from Durham University in 2001, with a degree in geography, he travelled extensively across Russia, China, India, South East Asia and South America before qualifying as chartered surveyor with Jones Lang LaSalle. He developed his own property business in Poland before establishing Bywater Properties, a London-based company focused on cross-sector UK property investment and development. It now has projects valued at more than £200m under development, and Richard remains its Chairman.

 

In 2012 Richard joined Iceland Foods, the company established by his father Malcolm in 1970. He worked full-time as a shelf-stacker and cashier in London for a year, before becoming a store manager in Swiss Cottage and moving to Iceland head office at Deeside, Flintshire, in 2013.

 

After various head office roles, including a spell running Iceland’s International division, Richard became Managing Director of The Food Warehouse, Iceland’s chain of 55 larger format stores, in 2015. He was also appointed Group Director for Sustainability in 2017.

 

Richard is married to Rebecca and they have two daughters and live in Cheshire. Outside family and business, Richard’s greatest passions are trail running, skiing, surfing and climbing all over the world. His notable climbing achievements include a 2011 expedition to climb the north side of Everest, and a 2017 trip to Kyrgyzstan where he notched up several first ascents of previously unclimbed mountains.

Turning the Tide. How to demand long lasting action?

Lucy Siegle

Turning the Tide. How to demand long lasting action?

Writer & Broadcaster

Lucy Siegle is a writer and broadcaster, specializing in environmental and social justice issues for a non specialist audience.

Since January 2018 she has been the BBC One Show’s dedicated correspondent reporting on the plastic pandemic. She has visited the UK’s first plastic free towns, investigated recycling infrastructure, heard the fears of small scale plastic manufacturers and worked with families trying to reduce their plastic consumption. Her book, Turning the Tide on plastic: how humanity (and you) can make our globe clean again will will be published by Trapeze Books this summer.

Lucy Siegle is a writer and broadcaster, specializing in environmental and social justice issues for a non specialist audience.

 

Since January 2018 she has been the BBC One Show’s dedicated correspondent reporting on the plastic pandemic. She has visited the UK’s first plastic free towns, investigated recycling infrastructure, heard the fears of small scale plastic manufacturers and worked with families trying to reduce their plastic consumption. Her book, Turning the Tide on plastic: how humanity (and you) can make our globe clean again will will be published by Trapeze Books this summer.

 

Creating fuels from non-recyclable plastic waste

Carlos Monreal

Creating fuels from non-recyclable plastic waste

CEO Plastic Energy

Founder and CEO of Inlandgeo, a company supplying high tech electronic instruments and turnkey solutions in multiple industries for 24 years.

President of Abasol for seven years. This company offered consultancy and EPC solutions on renewable energy and efficiency.

Founder and CEO of Greenland Capital, a company with the vision to identify and develop disruptive technologies that provide sustainable and economical solutions to the growing challenges of waste management and alternative energy management.

Founder and CEO of Inlandgeo, a company supplying high tech electronic instruments and turnkey solutions in multiple industries for 24 years.

 

President of Abasol for seven years. This company offered consultancy and EPC solutions on renewable energy and efficiency.

 

Founder and CEO of Greenland Capital, a company with the vision to identify and develop disruptive technologies that provide sustainable and economical solutions to the growing challenges of waste management and alternative energy management.

 

On how good design can solve the waste problem

Ketna Hirji

On how good design can solve the waste problem

Founder Cirkkel

After spending the majority of her professional working life at Google, Ketna decided to move to India to explore manufacturing and product development. She has designed beautiful products made from recycled plastic which are currently exclusive to a concession at Selfridges. She has also designed the world's first wearable travel blanket which is launching this year. Her other hours are spent helping tech start ups raise investment through a programme funded by the Mayor of London.

After spending the majority of her professional working life at Google, Ketna decided to move to India to explore manufacturing and product development. She has designed beautiful products made from recycled plastic which are currently exclusive to a concession at Selfridges. She has also designed the world’s first wearable travel blanket which is launching this year. Her other hours are spent helping tech start ups raise investment through a programme funded by the Mayor of London.

On seaweed packaging

Lise Honsinger

On seaweed packaging

COO Skipping Rocks Lab

Lise is the Chief Commercial Officer of start-up Skipping Rocks Lab whose mission is ‘to make packaging disappear’. The company has developed Ooho, a fully biodegradable flexible packaging made from seaweed extract, that intends to replace plastic bottles in consumption on-the-go market. Prior to Skipping Rocks, Lise worked in private equity investing in renewable energy, helping build more than 100MWs of grid connected solar in the Philippines. She has degrees in environmental science from Oxford University and Imperial College London.

Lise is the Chief Commercial Officer of start-up Skipping Rocks Lab whose mission is ‘to make packaging disappear’. The company has developed Ooho, a fully biodegradable flexible packaging made from seaweed extract, that intends to replace plastic bottles in consumption on-the-go market. Prior to Skipping Rocks, Lise worked in private equity investing in renewable energy, helping build more than 100MWs of grid connected solar in the Philippines. She has degrees in environmental science from Oxford University and Imperial College London.

Recyclable paper cups

Martin Myerscough

Recyclable paper cups

CEO Frugalpac

Martin Myerscough, Frugalpac’s founder, is a serial inventor and entrepreneur.

An engineer by training, he is a chartered accountant who began his career in that sector.

He became a manager at Arthur Andersen before leaving in 1993 to become Finance Director of KS Biomedix Holdings a biotechnology company.

Today, Martin remains focussed on Frugalpac and its revolutionary products, the Frugal Cup, Frugal Carton and Frugal Bottle.

Martin Myerscough, Frugalpac’s founder, is a serial inventor and entrepreneur.

 

An engineer by training, he is a chartered accountant who began his career in that sector.

 

He became a manager at Arthur Andersen before leaving in 1993 to become Finance Director of KS Biomedix Holdings a biotechnology company.

 

Today, Martin remains focussed on Frugalpac and its revolutionary products, the Frugal Cup, Frugal Carton and Frugal Bottle.

 

An end to plastic straws

Stefaan De Wildeman

An end to plastic straws

Founder B4PLASTICS

Stefaan De Wildeman graduated as a Chemical Engineer in Applied Biological Sciences (KULeuven, 1998), and finished his PhD after discovering a new bacterial species dehalorespiring chlorinated organic pollutants in groundwater (Ghent University / Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, 2002).

Since 2002, he joined DSM as an Associate Scientist in the field of Biocatalysis, the cross-over of his core interests in organic chemistry and microbiology. That days, Biocatalysis served several DSM businesses in Pharma, Anti-Infectives, Nutritionals, Vitamins and Plastic Materials. As a Senior Scientist, he started to explore the potential of Biocatalysis to link renewable raw materials to new biobased building blocks for novel materials with added functionality.

In 2013, Stefaan started up a research group and strategic early-phase projects on new biobased building blocks at Maastricht University, in close cooperation with regional academia and global industries. From this position, his vision on biobased materials further matured by co-starting up two new Biobased Institutes: Aachen-Maastricht Institute for BioBased Materials (AMIBM) and Institute for Science&Technology (InSciTe). He also helped to lay the foundation for the new Master in Biobased Materials at Maastricht University.

Inspired by increasing dynamics, challenges and opportunities in the plastics industry, he founded B4plastics, a company with a radical eco-plastics vision and a world-new product portfolio. “Tomorrow’s Plastics” will be built up from more local and renewable resources, will allow consumers to enjoy and understand their plastics, and will be designed for a sustainable afterlife. This vision is reflected in niche products designed and marketed by the young company. B4plastics is on a mission: awake our world from its fossil dreams and medieval plastic behaviours and guide it to a more enjoyable and sustainable materials future.

Stefaan De Wildeman graduated as a Chemical Engineer in Applied Biological Sciences (KULeuven, 1998), and finished his PhD after discovering a new bacterial species dehalorespiring chlorinated organic pollutants in groundwater (Ghent University / Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, 2002).

 

Since 2002, he joined DSM as an Associate Scientist in the field of Biocatalysis, the cross-over of his core interests in organic chemistry and microbiology. That days, Biocatalysis served several DSM businesses in Pharma, Anti-Infectives, Nutritionals, Vitamins and Plastic Materials. As a Senior Scientist, he started to explore the potential of Biocatalysis to link renewable raw materials to new biobased building blocks for novel materials with added functionality.

 

In 2013, Stefaan started up a research group and strategic early-phase projects on new biobased building blocks at Maastricht University, in close cooperation with regional academia and global industries. From this position, his vision on biobased materials further matured by co-starting up two new Biobased Institutes: Aachen-Maastricht Institute for BioBased Materials (AMIBM) and Institute for Science&Technology (InSciTe). He also helped to lay the foundation for the new Master in Biobased Materials at Maastricht University.

 

Inspired by increasing dynamics, challenges and opportunities in the plastics industry, he founded B4plastics, a company with a radical eco-plastics vision and a world-new product portfolio. “Tomorrow’s Plastics” will be built up from more local and renewable resources, will allow consumers to enjoy and understand their plastics, and will be designed for a sustainable afterlife. This vision is reflected in niche products designed and marketed by the young company. B4plastics is on a mission: awake our world from its fossil dreams and medieval plastic behaviours and guide it to a more enjoyable and sustainable materials future.

Refillable Household Cleaning Products

Angus Grahame

Refillable Household Cleaning Products

Founder Splosh

Angus Grahame is the founder of Splosh, which sells refillable laundry, home cleaning and personal care products. Splosh make refilling easier than recycling – which helps their customers cut plastic waste by over 96%. Refills come as concentrates in pouches which are diluted with tap water to make usable products. Pouches can be returned to Splosh for cleaning and refilling.

Angus Grahame is the founder of Splosh, which sells refillable laundry, home cleaning and personal care products. Splosh make refilling easier than recycling – which helps their customers cut plastic waste by over 96%. Refills come as concentrates in pouches which are diluted with tap water to make usable products. Pouches can be returned to Splosh for cleaning and refilling.

The rise of the circular economy

Jamie Hall

The rise of the circular economy

Co-founder and CMO of Pentatonic

How to Give Up Plastic

Will McCallum

How to Give Up Plastic

Head of Oceans at Greenpeace UK

Will McCallum is the Head of Oceans at Greenpeace UK where he instigated and ran the hugely successful plastic campaign and most recently set up and leads the global campaign across more than 30 countries to create the world’s largest protected area in the Antarctic Ocean. He is leading Greenpeace’s ship, the Artic Sunrise on an expedition to the Weddell Sea and on a recent trip discovered trances of plastic within Antarctic ice. His book, How to Give Up Plastic, is out this year.

Will McCallum is the Head of Oceans at Greenpeace UK where he instigated and ran the hugely successful plastic campaign and most recently set up and leads the global campaign across more than 30 countries to create the world’s largest protected area in the Antarctic Ocean. He is leading Greenpeace’s ship, the Artic Sunrise on an expedition to the Weddell Sea and on a recent trip discovered trances of plastic within Antarctic ice. His book, How to Give Up Plastic, is out this year.

Facilitator

Hannah Macinnes

Facilitator

Freelance journalist

Hannah MacInnes is a regular host and moderator for the How To Academy, chairing interviews, events and debates across a wide range of subjects and current issues.

Before going Freelance she worked for over 7 years at BBC Newsnight, as Planning Editor and as a producer / filmmaker. Whilst there she secured a number of newsmaking interviews with leading figures, including former Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi, Mikhail Gorbachev and a UK broadcast exclusive with Hillary Clinton, as well as with a range of cultural names from Helen Mirren to Benedict Cumberbatch.

She writes for the Radio Times and moderates at other major literary events including Hay and Cheltenham Festivals.

Hannah MacInnes is a regular host and moderator for the How To Academy, chairing interviews, events and debates across a wide range of subjects and current issues.

 

Before going Freelance she worked for over 7 years at BBC Newsnight, as Planning Editor and as a producer / filmmaker. Whilst there she secured a number of newsmaking interviews with leading figures, including former Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi, Mikhail Gorbachev and a UK broadcast exclusive with Hillary Clinton, as well as with a range of cultural names from Helen Mirren to Benedict Cumberbatch.

 

She writes for the Radio Times and moderates at other major literary events including Hay and Cheltenham Festivals.

Moderator

Justin Gillis

Moderator

New York Times

Justin Gillis is an author and consultant working on a book about how to solve global warming. He spent nearly a decade as a reporter for The New York Times covering environmental science, with a special focus on climate change, and is now a contributing opinion writer for the newspaper. He was the author of a Times series called Temperature Rising that ran from 2010 to 2013 and updated readers on major developments in climate science, winning the John B. Oakes Award for Distinguished Environmental Journalism from Columbia University. He was also the principal author in 2014 of a series called The Big Fix that critically examined proposed solutions to climate change. In 2015, he was part of the Times team that covered the Paris climate conference, which produced the world’s most ambitious agreement to tackle global warming. He traveled to Antarctica twice in 2016 to create a series of articles and virtual-reality videos on the risk that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet will collapse in a warming world.

He is a native of southern Georgia and a graduate of the University of Georgia, in journalism. Earlier in his career he worked at the Associated Press, The Miami Herald and The Washington Post. For the latter newspaper, he covered genetics, biotechnology and the completion of the Human Genome Project. In the 2004-2005 academic year, he was a Knight Fellow in Science Journalism at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Justin Gillis is an author and consultant working on a book about how to solve global warming. He spent nearly a decade as a reporter for The New York Times covering environmental science, with a special focus on climate change, and is now a contributing opinion writer for the newspaper. He was the author of a Times series called Temperature Rising that ran from 2010 to 2013 and updated readers on major developments in climate science, winning the John B. Oakes Award for Distinguished Environmental Journalism from Columbia University. He was also the principal author in 2014 of a series called The Big Fix that critically examined proposed solutions to climate change. In 2015, he was part of the Times team that covered the Paris climate conference, which produced the world’s most ambitious agreement to tackle global warming. He traveled to Antarctica twice in 2016 to create a series of articles and virtual-reality videos on the risk that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet will collapse in a warming world.

 

He is a native of southern Georgia and a graduate of the University of Georgia, in journalism. Earlier in his career he worked at the Associated Press, The Miami Herald and The Washington Post. For the latter newspaper, he covered genetics, biotechnology and the completion of the Human Genome Project. In the 2004-2005 academic year, he was a Knight Fellow in Science Journalism at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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